CHALLENGE

How to make the origin and social value of the work and rehabilitation projects of Santa Casa’s property known to the general public through a digital solution?

PROBLEM/NEED

The problem/need is at the level of the knowledge that the general public has regarding the activities developed by SCML in the rehabilitation and valuation of its property. It is necessary for the public to have a greater knowledge of the social/cultural and property value and of the innovative solutions that the rehabilitation projects and the maintenance and repair works of Santa Casa property represent for the city, in general, and for the communities and people, in particular. A digital solution is intended that shows the various property rehabilitation and conservation projects, highlighting the social dimension resulting from this activity. On the other hand, it is important to reveal other information such as the historical background and origin of this property and to recognise the benefactors who donate their property, often with precise indications about its use.

Caring for the spaces where the social, healthcare and services equipment from Santa Casa are installed has implications for the well-being and quality of life of its users (direct and indirect), attributing a social dimension to the financial investment made. In addition, innovative solutions such as intergenerational homes or the financing of Santa Casa’s mission through rehabilitation projects for Short Rental are also worthy of note.

Santa Casa da Misericórdia de Lisboa (SCML) also carries out its social mission through the rehabilitation of its extensive real estate. Caring for the most vulnerable is a job still recognised today by hundreds of benefactors who entrust Santa Casa with goods for solidarity purposes.Charity is the origin of 93% of the property which proves the high confidence in the institution and in its management.

As regards the purpose of SCML’s assets, they are divided into: 1) the buildings where homes, nurseries, health centres and other SCML services are installed and 2) buildings that are intended for rent for housing and services (commercial and offices).

It is the responsibility of the Department of Real Estate and Property Management (DGIP) to manage these assets, respecting the obligations assumed with the benefactors. This trust entails the responsibility and the commitment to preserve, rehabilitate and monetise these properties, in order to generate revenues which then finance the “Good Causes” supported by Santa Casa in the fields of social welfare health, education and culture.

Based on the strategic values currently defended by the institution – innovation, intergenerationality and research – this Department has sought to find innovative solutions for the best return on assets. For example, the Short Rental project, , aimed at short-term rental of property takes advantage of the tourist-friendly location of the dwellings to achieve a greater return than that achieved through the monthly lease. (http://www.scml.pt/pt-PT/destaques/santa_casa_no_short_rental/).

Also projects such as the Quinta Alegre reflect new concepts in the social action responses of the institution, through the creation of intergenerational spaces with different solutions aggregated in the same space, taking advantage of the conviviality among the different users. (https://www.pressreader.com/portugal/publico-imobiliario/20170405/281638190054535).

The rehabilitation of SCML real-estate also enables more people and more life to be brought into the urban centre, contributing to the rejuvenation of the city. The historical value is also testimony to the collective memory of the institution, and simultaneously expresses the evolution of Portuguese architecture between the sixteenth and twenty-first centuries. For Santa Casa, it is a timeless duty to take care of its property through its conservation, maintenance and rehabilitation.

More information at:http://microsite.scml.pt/reabilitar.

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SOCIAL WELFARE
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CULTURE
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SOCIAL ECONOMY
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HEALTH